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New Adobe Target Eases Optimization Tasks

Adobe wants you to optimize your site, continuously improving content and appearance to achieve your business goals. Optimization is good for you: Adobe Target is responsible for increasing revenue to all of its users by $100M. And it’s good for Adobe, because your success drives Adobe’s success.

Adobe’s latest release of Target removes four substantial barriers to your continuous improvement efforts. This is a very big deal for Adobe and for Target users. The release makes it significantly easier to run tests, track progress, and manage your Adobe Target budget. And, Adobe has made a specific and significant commitment to response time of the Target service.

First, the UI has been dramatically improved. Marketers and merchandisers can now easily create variants of a page or experience, so that alternatives can be tested – or the customer experience can be tailored to a customer segment. For example, you might test (or target) homepage banners by viewing the home page from within the Target UI; identifying alternative banners; and indicating when or for whom the alternatives will be tested. You also specify the goal of the test, and how success will be measured.

And how do you communicate the results? Ahhh. This is the second UI innovation, which is differentiating and a bar for others: Pinterest-style boards. These boards communicate the campaign, test, and site information each individual in your organization needs. You find something you need to discuss, you pin it and share it. You need to create a dashboard for a campaign, or an executive, you pin the appropriate feeds. You follow the boards that are relevant to you. I think this is so brilliant. Why is the rest of the world stuck in “standard reports?” Standard reports are always replete with information that isn’t relevant to a particular person or task or campaign, making it hard to learn what to look at and what to ignore, in which circumstances.

Third, Adobe’s pricing for Target is no longer associated with the number of tests that are run. More optimization and targeting are in everybody’s interests – yours, your customers’, and Adobe’s. So, thanks Adobe, you just made the world a better place. Pricing is now based on page views, which is a universal (but crude) measure of a site’s success. So not only is it easier to set up tests you want to run, you don’t have to hold back on testing out of concerns about your Adobe tests budget.

Fourth, Adobe has established a performance goal for its services that observe and respond to visitor behavior. Performance is always a concern, and anything that adds to site response time (such as business rules that tailor the site’s behavior) is unwelcome. Performance concerns can be a barrier to testing. You may or may not be content with Adobe’s performance goal of 300 milliseconds, but Target is a better product for having the goal. Projects to improve performance in any software realm are often expensive, extensive, invasive, hard to predict and justify. Now that Adobe has established a goal, projects to improve performance now have greater development priority. This is good news for Adobe customers and their site visitors.

Adobe has made great strides with Target in this release. I’m even more excited about plans that I think will increase the value of Target exponentially. Features planned for next year will make it easier to run an optimization program, and to embed optimization into business strategy and marketing practices. Stay tuned.

Locayta’s UI for Personalization

Locayta UI

Locayta’s control panel provides a view of the page being worked on. In this example, the page has been configured to sequence items based on price, popularity, and stock levels.. The navigation facets are selected by Locayta based on rules. Balance Factor, which is a differentiator of the Locayta solution, allows merchants to outline their merchandising strategies and priorities without having to create myriad rules.

Tasks

I want dinner, but first I need a recipe and groceries. And that means I need to find my car keys. If this was Apple software, the UI would be all about dinner and I’d be feeling it was all so stylish. If it were legacy IBM, the UI would be all about places I might have left my car keys and I’d be feeling frustrated because what I want is dinner. But let’s face it: whether I’m thinking Dinner or Keys, I still need recipes, groceries and car keys.

The best UIs let me enter a trail at any point, and navigate to a successful conclusion. The worst UIs dictate your path, demanding that you find your keys before considering what you’d like to eat.

In my view, Locayta’s UI provides a flexible approach to tasks. If your task is concrete and discrete – “I want to add a synonym for trousers” – the path is quite straightforward. If your task is fuzzier – “I need to increase sales of this season’s items” – there are myriad entry points that will lead you to action. You can start at the control panel and act on any of your site assets and behaviors that are involved in Locayta FreeStyle Merchandising. Or, you can view your site pages in the context of various customer behaviors, and then click into the control panel to make changes. And come back to the site to preview the impact.

The UI is used by marketing managers and merchandisers to improve selling – revenue, order size, margin, inventory, customer acquisition. The tasks users perform using the Locayta UI include:

  • Improve search results via spell correction, synonyms and matching logic
  • Tailor a landing, category, or search results page based on customer behavior or history, to increase sales by presenting the most interesting items
  • Define which banners and offers, such as free shipping, should be shown in which circumstances
  • Create a collection of items that are temporarily of common interest, such as red items near Valentine’s Day or dresses similar to the one the Duchess of Cambridge  wore last night
  • Add new products, categories and collections
  • Create and manage pages, zones, and rules

The chief Locayta concepts are balance factor, category, collection, page, zone, rule, trigger, and custom variable. Pages have zones for presenting content; zones have rules for controlling what is displayed. Four kinds of content can appear in a zone: search results, category page results, recommendation results, and static assets. Rules incorporate triggers, appearance, product options, facets, filters, and default ordering.

Custom variables are pieces of information passed to Locayta by the storefront as a customer navigates the Web site, such as item category or customer segment. The collection concept provides another way of grouping products (other than category, search or behavioral recommendations).  Examples: Gowns Worn at Oscars, Valentine’s Day, Seen In Vogue.

Balance Factor lets merchants influence how Locayta chooses and ranks items for recommendations, search results, landing pages, and category pages by expressing their priorities. For example, merchants can choose to emphasize low priced items for value shoppers, and high end items for luxury shoppers. Rules allow merchants to provide specific instructions for what content should be displayed. Balance factor allows merchants to indicate their priorities, without having to imagine every situation and dictate actions. I think balance factor is a great feature.

The control panel has tabs for data, rules, reports, control panel users, settings, and help. New users will find the help tab very helpful: it offers two dozen videos that explain how to apply Locayta’s concepts to common merchandising tasks. The Help tab also provides contacts for first, second and third level of support. CEO Andre Brown is the fourth level of support, and his mobile number is right there, for anyone in trouble to call. I’m impressed with what this says about Locayta’s commitment to their customers’ success.

Merchandisers will spend most of their time with data and rules. The UI guides you along short paths associated with each task, such as catalog-category-subcategory, or page-zone-rule. You can easily move along these paths, and easily exit to another path. Each layer is presented visually, until you dig into concepts that aren’t graphical. For example, production options and filters. At this point, you have a form or wizard to work with. But the rule you are working on is represented on your page, in the context of the zone the rule appears in. I think the context that is provided visually makes it easier for merchandisers to keep sight of what they are doing, and avoid getting buried by details.

The UI is consistently presented across tasks. More importantly, triggers, variables, rules and zones are also consistently managed for search, navigation, recommendations, categories and zones.

To make tasks easier, swifter, and the results more consistent, any definition can be reused by copying and modifying it. For example, a zone used on the Product Page could be reused on the Category page. The Product Page itself could be copied, renamed and modified to create a new page.

Selling by Segment

Locayta supports optimization testing by reporting on the absolute and relative performance of all areas of the clients site.. Also it has features that support targeting to a segment. Customer segment or behavior, or any other data point that clients provide can be used to trigger rules that select content, facets, banners, search results and recommendations. Locayta reports on performance of rules provide analysis of activity by segment.

Locayta’s Personalization Approach

Whole bread, few holes

Whole bread, few holes

Whether you choose bread with a few large holes, many small holes, or densely packed with no holes depends on how you plan to use it, as well as your habits and preferences. Your choice of personalization solution is a choice of the holes you’ll live with (or try to fill), as well as a choice of the functions that surround the holes.

I see current personalization offerings as tackling two different problem sets: marketing campaigns or online selling. These two problem sets have a lot of overlap, and it would certainly be wonderful to see one personalization solution address all the functions for all marketing departments: but you go to war with the bread you can get, not the bread you want. For now, you can have hole-bread, but not whole-bread.

Locayta’s offering address online selling, aiming to provide what merchants need to drive web and mobile sales.  Locayta’s online merchandising platform (‘Freestyle Merchandising”) powers site search, navigation, recommendations, and behavior-driven merchandising, packaged as services that include:

Visual Merchandising. Site search, recommendations and behavioral merchandising

Locayta Search.  Intelligent navigation, predictive type-ahead, and Locayta Balance Factor which enables retailers to adjust search results based on metrics such as margin, popularity, newness to site and stock availability

Locayta Shop Window. A click to buy widget to deploy on 3rd party sites

Locayta M-Commerce. A click-to-buy iPhone shopping application

Locayta Search Mobile. A full text search engine for Apple iOS

Locayta Gift-finder. A tool to help shoppers choose a gift via a series of questions

Locayta’s differentiator is the combination of recommendations, search and visual merchandising in a single software framework, with a rules engine providing merchandiser control. Plus selling widgets to help merchants deal with unfamiliar touchpoints – mobile and 3rd party sites.

Locayta offers solutions for personalizing merchandising, search and navigation. The company has approximately one hundred customers in North America, Europe and Asia. Locayta was incorporated in 2002, and is headquartered in London UK. Its first product, Locayta Search, was launched in 2003. Merchandising, recommendations and behavioral capabilities were launched in 2009. Customers include Oakley, Hallmark, Urban Outfitters, British Telecom, Tesco clothing, Boohoo.com, and Superdry.

Four CSFs for B2B Personalization

The weekly summary gave everyone an instant picture of status – green, yellow or red—along with what just happened, what was about to happen, and where the problems were.

The weekly summary gave everyone an instant picture of status – green, yellow or red—along with what just happened, what was about to happen, and where the problems were.

This is the final of four blog posts detailing how Agilent answered those questions to achieve a successful, integrated, customer experience that supports marketing and pleases customers.

Implementation plans only tell us how one team dealt with their specific context. But the lessons learned, and elements critical to success, can be applied to many projects.

Neil Martin, head of Agilent’s e-business when the projects began, shared his assessment of the conditions that made the rollout of MyAgilent and ICE successful: predictable, on budget, aligned with business objectives, and achieving business goals.

In all, there are just four conditions that Neil described as critical to Agilent’s success:
1. Clarity in objectives, strategy, roles, and responsibilities
2. Short, Customer-Driven Development Cycle
3. Effective and committed sponsorship
4. Concise and frequent communications

1. Clarity in objectives, strategy, roles, and responsibilities
Before the customer engagement projects even began, Neil forced his project managers and the executives to collaboratively develop and document clear objectives. Success must be measurable as the attainment of a specific numerical goal. The team set up the structure for the projects, including very specific roles and responsibilities. Neil said, “We worked on it so hard that people got tired of it. But we didn’t stop until we had clear accountability. A mistake teams often make is that accountability seems to only flow downward. Our roles/responsibilities hold all parties accountable. If you are on this project, you are accountable.”

2. Short, Customer-Driven Development Cycle
Agilent has guiding principles for projects: Set achievable project goals and meet them. Focus on critical priorities. External customers come first.

Neil and his project managers broke the customer engagement initiative into releases that delivered new capabilities every 6 months. All decisions were based on customer input and testing. As Neil observes, “There are so many internal opinions, it is hard to decide. So the default answer is customer testing and measuring customer preferences. The customer voice eliminates the internal debate.”

For example, the plan to require some level of customer login for downloads was very controversial within Agilent. There was staunch resistance and considerable anxiety about the customer experience impact. So the team built and deployed the login in such a way that it could be rolled back if customer reaction was negative. Knowing that customer satisfaction would guide the decision about the login requirement made the risk acceptable.

3. Effective and committed sponsorship
Executives have plenty on their plates, and conflicting demands. How do you get sufficient commitment to your projects that you can be successful?

Embed the outcome of your project into executives’ metrics. ICE goals included a higher customer satisfaction score, a large number of registered users, and a specific conversion rate for qualified leads. Various executives had ownership of these business goals. This establishes accountability as well as motivation to support the ICE project.

4. Concise and frequent communications
The Project Management Office, comprised of one very organized person working with a project office in IT, tracked the progress of all three ICE projects and coordinated their status. Since all three threads – MyAgilent, gated content, and marketing automation—were interdependent, all projects had to succeed. Every Friday, the PMO dashboard provided status of the entire program showing the key elements of each project. Overall status was summarized in a single PPT slide: elements were green, yellow, or red. Drilling down revealed the reasons for status. It was easy to see what the holdups were, and also clear what the to-dos and responsibilities were.

Executives, including the CIO and CMO, received a monthly review of business readiness of the projects’ capabilities, as well as formal program reviews.

Agilent Technologies is a world-leading measurement company. Its singular focus on measurement helps scientists and engineers alike with its designs and manufacturing of scientific instrumentation. The company is organized into four business groups: Chemical Analysis, Life Sciences, Diagnostics and Genomics, and Electronic Measurement. You might remember Agilent’s birth in 1999 as a spin-off from HP. This case study reflects customer experience and marketing evolution at the Electronic Measurement Group of Agilent.

Agilent is an illuminating example of how – and why—companies can succeed with personalization initiatives.

Agilent Personalization is Tactic, Not Strategy

Agilent’s integrated customer experience is built on three capabilities: MyAgilent.com personal portal page; gated content which motivates visitors to identify themselves; and a marketing automation engine that collects and uses data about customer interests to strip away irrelevant information and make interactions valuable for customers.

Agilent’s integrated customer experience is built on three capabilities: MyAgilent.com personal portal page; gated content which motivates visitors to identify themselves; and a marketing automation engine that collects and uses data about customer interests to strip away irrelevant information and make interactions valuable for customers.


This is the third of four blog posts detailing how Agilent answered those questions to achieve a successful, integrated, customer experience that supports marketing and pleases customers.

Agilent does not have a personalization strategy. It has a customer engagement strategy, which employs the tactics of a personalized web page for customers and personalized communications. The personalization of Agilent’s customer experience is a result of Agilent’s goals for customer satisfaction, registered customers, known users, and qualified leads, not an end in itself.

In 2010, Agilent reviewed its web capabilities and recognized that it needed to both deliver and capture more value. Over the course of six months, strategic discussions established the business objectives, metrics, funding and tactics for e-business investments. Customers provided the direction: give us a personal page to consolidate all the tools and logins and data we need to do our jobs. Marketing provided the structure: increase customer engagement and qualified leads by personalizing interactions and communications.

To achieve these two interrelated goals, the Integrated Customer Engagement (ICE) strategy was established. Three projects were identified to implement that strategy:
1. MyAgilent personal page. This is a customer portal page that delivers information and services supporting personalized engagement.
2. Marketing automation. Automated processes proactively engage and nurture web prospects and customers based on their profile and behavior.
3. Gated content. Certain types of content require visitors to provide minimal identification; this identification enables content delivery and captures visitor interests.

The three projects are like cogwheels that drive each other. MyAgilent is a personalized customer experience, feeding information to marketing automation which in turn personalizes customer communications. Gating some content encourages customers to identify themselves and to log in. Together, these three projects create a virtuous circle. MyAgilent capabilities encourage customers to log in; logged in customers provide information on their interests; their interests drive the personalization of marketing’s communications; gated content encourages log in.

Agilent already had a Customer Experience Improvement project underway when ICE was established. Improving the customer experience was key to increasing traffic and stickiness, the basis for making ICE a success. The research, planning, and budget for customer experience helped jumpstart the ICE projects. MyAgilent was identified as one tactic for improving customer experience, not the only tactic, and not a “competing” tactic. Folding ICE into the existing customer experience project promoted the success of MyAgilent. The value of such internal cooperation seems obvious from the outside, and in hindsight, but too many corporate cultures reward competition more highly than business results.

The customer engagement strategy has very specific goals, which are adjusted annually:
• Improve customer satisfaction, as measured by external customer surveys, to a new high (specific target)
• Increase known visitors by 10X
• Double the conversion rate of engagements to leads

Agilent Technologies is a world-leading measurement company. Its singular focus on measurement helps scientists and engineers alike with its designs and manufacturing of scientific instrumentation. The company is organized into four business groups: Chemical Analysis, Life Sciences, Diagnostics and Genomics, and Electronic Measurement. You might remember Agilent’s birth in 1999 as a spin-off from HP. This case study reflects customer experience and marketing evolution at the Electronic Measurement Group of Agilent.

Agilent is an illuminating example of how – and why—companies can succeed with personalization initiatives.

MyAgilent: Personal Portal Becomes Keystone of Effective Marketing

While the MyAgilent personalizes visits, marketing automation personalizes outreach such as this email news item for customers who use oscilloscopes.

While the MyAgilent personalizes visits, marketing automation personalizes outreach such as this email news item for customers who use oscilloscopes.

This is the second of four blog posts detailing how Agilent answered those questions to achieve a successful, integrated, customer experience that supports marketing and pleases customers.

Over the past decade, Agilent recognized a growing need for deeper customer relationships. As in most B2B companies, customer relationships had traditionally been in the hands of the sales team who work with people in various roles at each account and knew their goals, issues, and requirements. This person-to-person knowledge had gradually eroded with the advent of channel partners and larger sales territories, and is difficult to share even as company-wide knowledge of customers has become more important to achieve sales, support, and quality goals. CRM and ERP systems did not store the customer data that would make sales and marketing more effective. With a majority of sales coming from existing customers, knowing who they are and what they want became a strategic imperative.

Agilent’s web site was an obvious vehicle for increasing customer intimacy. But historically, customers have been using Agilent.com as a reference library, a source of software updates, product specifications, and technical documentation. Marketing campaigns were generalized blasts, one-and-done rather than targeted and multi-touch.

As the second decade of the century began, Agilent adopted a strategic initiative to make Agilent.com a vehicle for customer engagement that would improve the effectiveness of sales and marketing.

B2B customer relationships are always a challenge, because the “customer” is a company, and the customer is also many different people with very different roles. Agilent knows some customers quite well, and others hardly at all. Agilent has a close relationship with the technicians whose career is measurement, and with purchasing departments. But many customers are hidden from Agilent, including customers who have purchased their equipment from a third party, as well as production engineers who only occasionally look to Agilent for information. Agilent may not have data about the model of equipment they rely on, or their contact information, or even their names. The first objective was to identify more customers, and then understand what each person wanted.

MyAgilent is central to learning about these customers, as well as a vehicle for engaging them. Better customer information means Agilent can tailor communications to the most relevant information. When a customer downloads an update, it’s a fair bet he is using that model. Future communications can include critical information about that model. Without that information, Agilent can’t effectively notify customers that, for example, an update has been released. Think about it: if every week you get a News email that includes a dozen “critical” messages about products you don’t use, you are not going to open the News. Conversely, if the News is all “must know” information, you wouldn’t miss it.

Mike Kawasaki, Agilent’s head of e marketing, observes a sea change in marketing that he sees as another step in Agilent’s transformation. He described it this way: “10-15 years ago manufacturing went through major changes, with plant consolidation, overseas production, and new supply chain processes. 5 yrs ago, channels were transformed with the advent of channel partners and programs. Now marketing’s transformation has begun. I think it is a 5 year journey that will end with marketing responsible for customer touch, identifying where they are in the buying process, and managing customer data. Sales and marketing will align by region, country, and account type. The game has just begun –we are in the third inning.”

Mike cites a key lesson from this experience: the team “really underestimated the complexity of pulling data from and sending data among the various systems that are connected to MyAgilent. It was a much greater technical challenge than expected. It took several tries to find a technology partner that could deliver the necessary functionality.”

MyAgilent is nearing the conclusion of a 3-year development roadmap. Its current capabilities unquestionably deliver value to customers, who are signing up for and using it at an accelerating rate. It delivers the following benefits to Agilent’s marketing team:
• MyAgilent’s value gives customers reason to identify themselves, enabling Agilent to learn who their customers are and engage them in dialog
• Customer actions and stated interests enhance the customer profile, aiding planning and campaign design
• Richer customer profiles enable Marketing to send most engaging News, offers and alerts
• MyAgilent provides an easy way for customers to tell Agilent which equipment they are working with (model and serial number)
• The MyAgilent page provides a venue for marketing communications

Jim Armentrout, head of marketing for the EU region, sees MyAgilent as a dramatic and necessary move, critical for pre- and post- sales. “The simple act of putting multiple tools and logins in one place is a big step forward. The newer aspects, such as user groups, dialogs and news, create a community of interested customers. If customers find it valuable, then they will come back, which gives me a chance to have great customer profiles. I can be selective about customer communications. I tailor every campaign. It is more efficient for us, and even better, we aren’t sending spam to customers.”

Agilent Technologies is a world-leading measurement company. Its singular focus on measurement helps scientists and engineers alike with its designs and manufacturing of scientific instrumentation. The company is organized into four business groups: Chemical Analysis, Life Sciences, Diagnostics and Genomics, and Electronic Measurement. You might remember Agilent’s birth in 1999 as a spin-off from HP. This case study reflects customer experience and marketing evolution at the Electronic Measurement Group of Agilent.

Agilent is an illuminating example of how – and why—companies can succeed with personalization initiatives.

B2B Personalization: Agilent’s Success Story

The MyAgilent personal page aims to quickly connect customers with information about all aspects of their relationship: Links to information about the equipment they use; status of their orders; alerts and news about their equipment; forums for advice on using the equipment; and their contacts at Agilent.

The MyAgilent personal page aims to quickly connect customers with information about all aspects of their relationship: Links to information about the equipment they use; status of their orders; alerts and news about their equipment; forums for advice on using the equipment; and their contacts at Agilent.

Agilent Technologies is a world-leading measurement company. Its singular focus on measurement helps scientists and engineers alike with its designs and manufacturing of scientific instrumentation. The company is organized into four business groups: Chemical Analysis, Life Sciences, Diagnostics and Genomics, and Electronic Measurement. You might remember Agilent’s birth in 1999 as a spin-off from HP. This case study reflects customer experience and marketing evolution at the Electronic Measurement Group of Agilent.

Agilent is an illuminating example of how – and why—companies can succeed with personalization initiatives.

Companies struggle with establishing and executing an integrated customer engagement strategy. What are the goals? What are the steps to success? What are the projects and programs to achieve higher engagement, and how are they identified? Who owns the integrated customer experience? What is the value? Agilent’s answers to these questions, and how they achieved the answers, provide insight for those still wrestling with transformation.

This is the first of four blog posts detailing how Agilent answered those questions to achieve a successful, integrated, customer experience that supports marketing and pleases customers. The four posts are as follows:
1. B2B Personalization: MyAgilent Delivers the Experience Customers Crave
2. MyAgilent: Personal Portal Becomes Keystone of Effective Marketing
3. Agilent Personalization is Tactic, Not Strategy
4. Four CSFs for B2B Personalization Tactics

B2B Personalization: MyAgilent Delivers the Experience Customers Crave

“I just want to go to one page, and see everything about my relationship: products, warranties, contracts, updates, alerts, projects, everything.” This has been a consistent refrain over the years from hundreds of Patricia Seybold Group clients’ business customers. This simple sounding request is not simple to deliver.

MyAgilent, the customer’s personal page for Agilent’s Electronic Measurement Group, delivers the personalized page customers have been asking for. It provides a single destination that merges more than a dozen separate systems and passwords. It allows customers to tailor the information they receive, and with one login and from one page, access the capabilities relevant to their jobs.

A complicating factor: Each individual customer has a different idea of just which capabilities are relevant.

For example, purchasing agents spend time with open orders and contracts. They are not interested in information on how to calibrate equipment. Measurement engineers, on the other hand, spend their days using Agilent products, and they need to access to warranty & calibration information, product updates, service schedules, and product support. Engineers in design and production have tasks that require measurement equipment, and these engineers are interested in insights on new measurement technology and insights on how to make measurements effectively.

All of these roles are satisfied by MyAgilent by providing information and tools specific to the person and role. As seen in the screenshot above, customers can view information specific to the products they use – as separate from the products they are “watching” (e.g., interested in buying or using). They see a list of the Agilent contacts that are specific to their account and equipment, so they have ready access to the right person. They see news relevant to their equipment and watch list. They can check order status or warranty data relevant to their equipment. They can seek advice from forums, repair service, technical documentation and updates for their equipment – uncluttered by a deluge of information on the vast array of equipment Agilent offers. Anyone who has ever wasted time studying an answer that, in the end, doesn’t apply to the OS version you’re actually using, appreciates the blessing of stripping out all the non-relevant information.

Customers love it.

This is because Agilent’s enhancements for MyAgilent are guided by customer requirements and relentless attention to customer testing and customer feedback. “We test everything with customers, and then analyze every element of feedback we get and optimize the designs accordingly. You can’t get the customer page right without customer involvement,” said Carl Daw, who headed up the MyAgilent project. In developing MyAgilent, the team was seeking a customer experience breakthrough. Customer satisfaction scores, though excellent, had stalled in their upward trend, and MyAgilent was the opportunity to move the needle. In this, MyAgilent has been successful, significantly improving customer satisfaction scores over the past two years.

Agilent Electronic Measurement Group measures the quality of MyAgilent in customer satisfaction scores, customer feedback, the percentage and number of customers registered for MyAgilent, and the rate of growth of MyAgilent usage.

The value to customers of MyAgilent is:
• Having a single access point to all Agilent apps – one page, one login – reduces password management efforts and login frustrations.
• MyAgilent users are not asked for credentials when they request downloads and other information, which saves time.
• Information is more useful and more visible. It is personalized to customers based on their country, company, products and specified preferences, so important information is no longer buried among notifications of no interest to them. The greater visibility of the important information helps customers avoid problems and seize opportunities for learning, maintaining, replacing, updating and using Agilent equipment.

Agilent Technologies is a world-leading measurement company. Its singular focus on measurement helps scientists and engineers alike with its designs and manufacturing of scientific instrumentation. The company is organized into four business groups: Chemical Analysis, Life Sciences, Diagnostics and Genomics, and Electronic Measurement. You might remember Agilent’s birth in 1999 as a spin-off from HP. This case study reflects customer experience and marketing evolution at the Electronic Measurement Group of Agilent.

Agilent is an illuminating example of how – and why—companies can succeed with personalization initiatives.

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